Scan Preparation

We cannot stress enough the importance of positioning the scan subject correctly and consistently. Also, a user should check the scanning environment prior to scanning. The extra time spent to ensure that one obtains the best possible scans will save countless hours of processing and analyzing the scan data. Remember, you will always have the scan data, but once the scan subject is gone, you may not have the opportunity to scan that subject again.

Subject Preparation

The subject should remove all jewelry, including eyeglasses. Hair is very difficult for a laser-based scanner to capture, so the subject's hair must be prepared in some way to guarantee good results. Cyberware suggests a light sprinkling of cornstarch in the subject's hair. Only a small amount of cornstarch is necessary, so you need not completely coat the subject. For even better results, use a make-up artist's spray. These sprays are commonly used to make a person look as if his/her hair is gray or white. These sprays are available in several colors at beauty-supply and crafts stores. For optimal results, cover the hair with a bald cap. This cap will provide the scanner with a surface that is free from problems. Additionally, long hair should be secured off of the neck in order to accurately capture data at the subject's neck. See the Tips & Tricks section below for more information.

Choosing the Type of Scan

With most Cyberware motion platforms, you will need to decide whether a linear or cylindrical scan is more appropriate for the object you wish to scan.

Cylindrical Scanning

To determine if cylindrical scanning is appropriate for the object you wish to digitize, consider the following:

Imagine an axis down the center of the object. If the surfaces of interest can be seen well by spinning the object around that axis and looking straight at its center, a cylindrical scan will probably be the best choice.

Placing the Subject for Cylindrical Scanning

When the subject is properly prepared for a scan, he/she should step onto the scan platform. The subject should be positioned with his/her head looking straight forward with the chin held slightly elevated, the shoulders should be relaxed, and the back held straight. It is not necessary for the subject's eyes to be open (under most circumstances), so if the subject would be more comfortable, advise him/her that it is acceptable to close the eyes. Please note that there are no known harmful effects from exposure to the laser light. Please refer to the Safety Section of this user guide for more information on the laser. The subject should also be advised to breathe normally during the scan in order to avoid motion artifacts caused by a tensing of the body.

The operator should next instruct the subject on any positional correction that may be required. The best results are obtained if the following conditions are met:

Linear Scanning

If you are only interested in one viewing angle, or the object is flat or complex, one or more linear scans may be more appropriate. Also, any object that has appendages or a very detailed surface would be best scanned using a linear motion setting and multiple linear scans.

Placing the Subject for Linear Scanning

As a general rule for any single linear scan, the object should be placed such that the surface of interest is no farther away from the scanner than about 29 cm for a 3030 or 14 cm for a 3030/Hires or Model 15. The object should be no closer than about 2 cm from the front lip of the digitizer head, or 0.75cm from the inside edge of the rotary platform on the Model 15. These distances can vary by a centimeter or two (0.25cm for a Model 15), depending upon the placement of the scanner on your particular motion platform.

Preparing the Subject

Objects or parts of objects may be light reflective or light absorbent; both of which are difficult to scan. If you need to include data on a difficult surface, you will need to have cornstarch, tempera paint, or a developer spray to coat the object, and a means to apply the coating. Tempera paint and a brush are included with every digitizer.

Tips and Tricks

Shiny Objects

If the color texture map is not required the object should be painted a matte gray color. We suggest using tempera paint for this, as tempera paints are easily washed off with a little water and a cloth. Another alternative is to use a developer spray. These sprays are typically used for flaw detection on metal parts during quality check procedures and are easily removed from the surface of an object.

If, however, the color texture maps are important, the model can be coated with a photographic dulling spray. This dulling spray will not affect the color maps, and does a fine job of dulling the surface. Please note that these sprays are difficult to remove from an object.

Dark Objects

If the color texture map is not required the object should be painted a matte gray color. We suggest using tempera paint for this, as tempera paints are easily washed off with a little water and a cloth. Another alternative is to use a developer spray. These sprays are typically used for flaw detection on metal parts during quality check procedures and are easily removed from the surface of an object.

If the color maps are important, the only way to completely capture a subject is to scan it several times and combine the multiple scan files using CyDir.

Capturing Hair

Hair is very difficult for a laser-based scanner to capture. We suggest a light sprinkling of cornstarch in the subject's hair to get acceptable results. Only a small amount of cornstarch is required, so you need not completely coat the subject.

For even better results, use a make-up artist's spray. These sprays are commonly used to make a person look as if his/her hair is gray. These sprays are available in several colors at beauty-supply and crafts stores.